Author explores Native American spirituality

Author Nanci Des Gerlaise grew up as the descendant of a long line of medicine men. She describes in "Muddy Waters" how she broke free.

Dreamcatchers, sweat lodges, ancestral spirits, alcoholism, and abuse: author Nanci Des Gerlaise grew up with them all. Her new book, "Muddy Waters: An Insider's View of North American Native Spirituality," which according to a news release exposes the current awakening and popularity of occult concepts borrowed from her Native roots.

"The focal point of my book is an appeal to the Christian audience to turn away from Native Spirituality and its demonic influences; I also want to equip them with the knowledge of how to deal with those in bondage to Native Spirituality."

In recent years, Des Gerlaise has noticed the trend of Native Spirituality slowly seeping into the public school systems under the guise of multiculturalism. She finds Christian's acceptance of Native Spirituality even more disturbing.

"My book exposes the current awakening and popularity of occult concepts and techniques in our culture. It's happening in many churches through the 'Emergent Church' movement. This new spirituality is the age-old evil of the occult just dressed up in another garb."

Born on a Métis Settlement in the late 1950s into a long line of medicine men, Nanci saw from an early age the effects this sorcery had on her large family. Her book features the story of her deliverance by the Lord Jesus Christ from the evils of her Native religion.

"I was rescued from the terrible darkness of Native American Spirituality; this book features my testimony as well as a solid Biblical analysis of our culture. It brings light to a muddy and little-understood subject at a time when demonic influences and deception are penetrating the culture and the churches."

Info: Winepressbooks.com

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