One million children at risk of dying from malnutrition in the Sahel - UNICEF

At least one million children are at risk of dying of malnutrition in the central-western part of Africa?s Sahel region due to a drought crisis, the United Nations Children?s Fund (UNICEF) said today, adding that more resources are urgently needed to help those in need.

A mother with her severely malnourished child in the Sahel region. Photo: UNICEF/Chad/2012/C Tidey

At least one million children are at risk of dying of malnutrition in the central-western part of Africa"s Sahel region due to a drought crisis, the United Nations Children"s Fund (UNICEF) said today, adding that more resources are urgently needed to help those in need.

"We estimate that in 2012 there will be over a million children suffering from severe acute malnutrition " what"s important to know is that malnutrition can kill," UNICEF"s Director of Emergency Programmes, Louis-Georges Arsenault, said in a news release. "We need more resources to really scale up our response before it becomes too late and too many lives are lost."

There are currently 15 million people facing food insecurity in the Sahel, which stretches from the Atlantic Ocean to the Red Sea. The nutrition crisis is affecting people throughout Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, and the northern regions of Cameroon, Nigeria and Senegal.

According to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affair (OCHA), the food and nutrition crisis facing countries in the Sahel has continued to deteriorate at an alarming rate this year, despite commendable early response efforts by governments and international aid agencies. The worsening food shortages and malnutrition have been compounded by conflict and insecurity.

Families " many of them living in the areas which are difficult to access " are now selling their livestock, taking their children out of schools and reducing their nutritional intake, which makes them even more vulnerable as the crisis develops, UNICEF said.

The agency has appealed for $120 million to expand its operations and provide health, nutrition, water and sanitation, education and child protection services in the affected countries " however, only half of the required funding has been donated so far.

Last month, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called on the global community to act quickly to what he described as a "cascading crisis" sweeping the region. In addition, the Security Council voiced serious concern over the rapidly deteriorating humanitarian crisis, saying that the presence of armed and terrorist groups, as well as the proliferation of weapons in the area, have exacerbated the problem.

UNICEF has already set up thousands of health centres in all affected countries and sent ready-to-use therapeutic food for the treatment of severe acute malnutrition among children. It has also dispatched nutritionists, emergency specialists and support staff to the affected areas and it is working with governments, non-governmental organizations and other UN agencies to tackle the crisis.





Source: UN News

Comments

Spero News
 

Disney drops 'Good Luck Charlie'

Most popular show on television in its time-slot for youth under 15.

Conference to focus on advances for Paraguayan electronic media

An international conference on digital migration will take place in Paraguay on July 4, just as the South American country concludes an agreement with El Salvador to share electronic content.

Mexico: Food prices sky-rocket

Tomatoes are going for $5.77 per kilo in Mexico.

On Heaven and Earth: an excerpt

Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, before his election to the papacy as Francis, conversed with Rabbi Abraham Skorka on the commonalities of Jewish and Catholic faith.

Islamic State beheads Christians for supposed 'apostasy'

A Syriac Orthodox bishop of Mount Lebanon and Tripoli has been quoted as saying that Muslims are 'enemies of Jesus', in light of both ancient and modern persecution of Christians. Graphic photos.

Chagas and chikungunya diseases spread in Texas

Chikungunya and Chagas disease are prevalent in Latin America. Visitors to those areas may be bringing it to the U.S. Dogs are a prime factor in spreading fatal Chagas infections.

After Israel, the next stop for Hamas is the Vatican

The Hamas terrorists have had no qualms about launching missiles at the holy city, Jerusalem, and the sites allegedly holy to Islam. So too they will have no qualms about attacking Rome.

Michigan subsidizes deer for wealthy landowners

Most deer reside on private land, according to Michigan's Department of Natural Resources, and thus need public money.

This page took 0.1641seconds to load