New material is nearly as light as air

The new metal, developed at UC-Irvine with assist from DARPA, is 99.9 percent air. Applications for nano-technology, batteries, and defense envisioned.

A team of researchers from University of California at Irvine, HRL Laboratories and the California Institute of Technology have developed the world's lightest material — with a density of 0.9 mg/cc — about 100 times lighter than Styrofoam.

The new material redefines the limits of lightweight materials because of its unique "micro-lattice" cellular architecture. The researchers were able to make a material that consists of 99.99 percent air by designing the 0.01 percent solid at the nanometer, micron and millimeter scales. "The trick is to fabricate a lattice of interconnected hollow tubes with a wall thickness 1,000 times thinner than a human hair," said lead author Dr. Tobias Schaedler of HRL.
 
The material's architecture allows unprecedented mechanical behavior for a metal, including complete recovery from compression exceeding 50 percent strain and extraordinarily high energy absorption.
 
"Materials actually get stronger as the dimensions are reduced to the nanoscale," explained UCI mechanical and aerospace engineer Lorenzo Valdevit, UCI's principal investigator on the project. "Combine this with the possibility of tailoring the architecture of the micro-lattice and you have a unique cellular material."
 
Developed for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the novel material could be used for battery electrodes and acoustic, vibration or shock energy absorption.
 
William Carter, manager of the architected materials group at HRL, compared the new material to larger, more familiar edifices: "Modern buildings, exemplified by the Eiffel Tower or the Golden Gate Bridge, are incredibly light and weight-efficient by virtue of their architecture. We are revolutionizing lightweight materials by bringing this concept to the nano and micro scales."

 

Comments

Israel: archaeologists' find confirms presence of Roman occupation army

A 2,000 year old commemorative inscription dedicated to the Emperor Hadrian was uncovered in Jerusalem that according to archaeologist Dr. Rina Avner 'is an extraordinary find of enormous historical importance'.

In reversal, Liberian president says ebola has brought country to standstill

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf pens letter to the world: This disease respects no borders.

Liberia: Ebola keeps Christians away from church

US health officials contradict President Obama's assurances that Ebola cannot be contracted by sitting adjacent to another person on a bus.

Israel: archaeologists' find confirms presence of Roman occupation army

A 2,000 year old commemorative inscription dedicated to the Emperor Hadrian was uncovered in Jerusalem that according to archaeologist Dr. Rina Avner 'is an extraordinary find of enormous historical importance'.

In reversal, Liberian president says ebola has brought country to standstill

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf pens letter to the world: This disease respects no borders.

Liberia: Ebola keeps Christians away from church

US health officials contradict President Obama's assurances that Ebola cannot be contracted by sitting adjacent to another person on a bus.

U.S. military can't stop Ebola contagion from Latin America

Marine Corp Gen. John Kelly expressed fears that human traffickers bringing illegal immigrants to the U.S. will also bring Ebola.

This page took 0.1367seconds to load