James Bond's Rolex sold

Christie's auctions Rolex watch worn by Roger Moore in 'Live and Let Die'

UPDATE: Christie's auction house in Geneva sold the famous Rolex timepiece on November 14, 2011 for $242,655.

The most famous Rolex Submariner of all, the rare 5513 timepiece that played a role in James Bond's "Live and Let Die", could be yours.

The quartermaster for British intelligence, known only by 'Q', equipped a Rolex, played by Sir Roger Moore, to deflect bullets and cut through steel. But Bond also found another use for it: to unzip a dress.

Modified by the production crew, the Rolex featured a higher height and a buzzsaw bezel that was useful during Bond's escape with Miss Solitaire (Jane Seymour) from Dr. Kananga's lair before the cruel villain could feed them to the sharks.

The watch that was seen by millions of people will be sold on November 14, 2011 by Christie's auction house and is expected to sell between $222,000 and $443,000.

But if you win the auction, don't expect a real magnetic field to help you move zippers.  

Madeline Smith, who played Miss Caruso -- whose dress was unzipped by Bond -- said that it really happened because a thin wire was attached to the zipper from the watch.

She also said the bedroom scene with Roger Moore was especially awkward because it was attended by his overprotective wife during the filming.

The watch still contains all the alterations from the film. If you buy it, you'll find a small pinhole where the wire to unzip the dress was attached to the watch. The containment is signed by Roger Moore but despite all the alterations, the 1972 Rolex still has its original bracelet.

If you have a half-million to spare, why not live a little?

Filed under entertainment, film, movies, james bond, culture, art, Europe

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