Nigeria: Anglican bishop calls on Christian leaders to refuse police protection

The Anglican bishop of Kaduna, Nigeria, says that his country is not about to break up, despite Muslim terrorist attacks.

Anglican Bishop Josiah Idowu-Fearon of Kaduna, Nigeria, said in a press conference that he is satisfied that Nigeria will not break up, despite the series of attacks on Christians unleashed by Islamist rebels known as Boko Haram. Bishop Idowu-Fearon said 2014 is the beginning of an important milestone in Nigeria's history.
 
"My main reason for this prophetic statement is based on my conviction that the one true God whom we worship keeps His covenant with His people. Nigerians worship this one true God differently, though they have some irreconcilable doctrinal understanding of this one God. This one true God made it possible for this country to be put together in 1914, He has not changed His mind on this nation being held together," said in an interview published by Daily Trust newspaper of Nigeria. 
 
In the January 12 interview, he added "It is on this platform that both Christians and Muslims can hope to continue to be together even after the 2015 general elections, because God is faithful and will not in spite of our madness and divisive tendencies allow what He has brought together to disintegrate."
 
The Anglican bishop urged fellow religious leaders to cease the pursuit of material things and the competition with the rich whose sources of wealth are not clean. He called on them to eschew flamboyant lifestyles and instead focus on speaking the truth and setting the example of Christian living by refusing police protection. 
"We do not have enough policemen and women in the country, therefore, the limited number we have is further strained by this practice," he stated.


Spero News editor Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat, who also worked as a democracy advocate and election observer in Latin America. He is also a freelance translator.

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