Kenya: UNAIDS welcomes High Court judgment on anti-counterfeit law

The lead United Nations agency dealing with the global HIV/AIDS response commended today the High Court of Kenya for a ruling on an anti-counterfeit law that will safeguard access to affordable generic medicines.

UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidib"Photo: UNAIDS/B. Hamilton

The lead United Nations agency dealing with the global HIV/AIDS response commended today the High Court of Kenya for a ruling on an anti-counterfeit law that will safeguard access to affordable generic medicines.

"A vast majority of people in Kenya rely on quality generic drugs for their daily survival. Through this important ruling, the High Court of Kenya has upheld a fundamental element of the right to health," said UNAIDS" Executive Director, Michel Sidib"in a press statement.

"This decision will set an important precedent for ensuring access to life-saving drugs around the world," he added.

According to UNAIDS, the High Court found that the definition of "anti-counterfeit" within the 2008 Anti-Counterfeit Act was too broad, with the judge involved explaining in her ruling that "the Act is vague and could undermine access to affordable generic medicines since the Act had failed to clearly distinguish between counterfeit and generic medicines."

The High Court called on Kenya"s Parliament to review the Act and remove ambiguities that could result in arbitrary seizures of generic medicines under the pretext of fighting counterfeit drugs. The judgment also stated that intellectual property rights should not override the right to life and health.

"We must have both generic drugs and strong anti-counterfeit laws," Mr Sidib"aid. "Generic drugs give more people access to life-saving treatment, while anti-counterfeit laws keep people safe."

Kenya"s national HIV treatment programme relies heavily on access to generic antiretroviral medicines. At the end of 2011, about 1.6 million people in Kenya were living with HIV. An estimated 743,000 Kenyans are eligible for antiretroviral treatment, of whom 539,000 are currently receiving it.

In low- and middle-income countries more than 80 per cent of the antiretroviral drugs used by the 6.6 million people on HIV treatment come from generic manufacturers. Nearly eight million additional people living with HIV were eligible for treatment at the end of 2010.





Source: UN News

Comments

Spero News
 

Disney drops 'Good Luck Charlie'

Most popular show on television in its time-slot for youth under 15.

Conference to focus on advances for Paraguayan electronic media

An international conference on digital migration will take place in Paraguay on July 4, just as the South American country concludes an agreement with El Salvador to share electronic content.

Mexico: Food prices sky-rocket

Tomatoes are going for $5.77 per kilo in Mexico.

On Heaven and Earth: an excerpt

Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, before his election to the papacy as Francis, conversed with Rabbi Abraham Skorka on the commonalities of Jewish and Catholic faith.

That Tell-Tale Heart: Questions to ask in cases of comatose patients

Proponents of organ donations have played fast and loose with the defintion of death in order to advance their goals. Obamacare may have irrevocably changed the physician/patient relationship, thus encouraging euthanasia.

Titanic survivors recall previously unknown gruesome details

Two sisters recount seeing 'Titanic' officers chopping off the hands of survivors grasping at lifeboats.

This page took 0.1328seconds to load