Nigeria: Catholic archbishop seeks dialogue after deadly terrorist bombings

"The situation is still confusing and the information on the number of people affected is still incomplete", said Catholic Archbishop Ignatius Ayau Kaigama of Jos, a city in central Nigeria. According to the Fides news service, he was speaking in the aftermath of the detonation of two car bombs on May 20 that claimed the lives of 118 people at the city’s main market. 
 
"Before the explosions, ethnic and religious divisions were trying to be dealt with among the different components of our society. Let me give an example: Two weeks ago we launched a fundraising campaign to build the new cathedral, given that the current one is too small to accommodate the faithful who attend the celebrations. We also invited Muslim leaders to attend the ceremony and we appreciated their presence. This is a clear demonstration of the progress made in the dialogue between Christians and Muslims."
 
"We are all worried, but dialogue continues and we are in touch with Muslim leaders. In fact Muslim leaders in Kaduna informed me that there had been a series of explosions in Jos. We should not be intimidated and we must continue our dialogue of peace", said Archbishop Kaigama.


Spero News editor Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat, who also worked as a democracy advocate and election observer in Latin America. He is also a freelance translator.

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