Google will assign 10,000 staff members to eliminate what the company regards as extremist content on YouTube next year. YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki wrote at Britain’s Daily Telegraph that some YouTube users were exploiting YouTube to "mislead, manipulate, harass or even harm." Google owns YouTube. She wrote that YouTube is using "computer-learning" technology to find extremist videos. Since June, more than 150,000 of these videos have been removed, she said. 

Wojcicki claimed that YouTube review almost 2 million videos since June, seeking violent and extremist content. She said that the experience has aided YouTube’s machine learning technology to identify similar videos, thus enabling staff to remove nearly five times as many videos as they were previously. The company is taking "aggressive action" on comments, she said, by using technology to help personnel to shut down hundreds of accounts and hundreds of thousands of comments.

Wojcicki said that her teams "work closely with child safety organisations around the world to report predatory behaviour and accounts to the correct law enforcement agencies." British police have reported that sex offenders are increasingly using live online streaming platforms to exploit children.

This year, the British government suspended its advertising at YouTube because of concerns that they were appearing next to undesirable content. In September, British Prime Minister Theresa May called on companies to eliminate terrorist videos within two hours. She has repeatedly called for tech firms to eliminate so-called “safe spaces” used by terrorists.

Google announced this year it would give a total of £1million ($1.3 million) to help counter extremism in the UK. Using its machine learning technology, YouTube is working with 15 groups, including the Anti-Defamation League, the No Hate Speech Movement, and the Institute for Strategic Dialogue. Videos that have been flagged by users as potential violations of YouTube policy on hate speech and extremism will be reviewed. YouTube will also redirect searches on its website for certain keywords towards a playlist of curated YouTube videos that confront and debunk violent extremist messages
 



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Spero News editor Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat, who also worked as a democracy advocate and election observer in Latin America. His first novel 'Shaken Earth', is available at Amazon.

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