"I am afraid that there is a certain class of race-problem solvers who don't want the patient to get well, because as long as the disease holds out they have not only an easy means of making a living, but also an easy medium through which to make themselves prominent before the public. My experience is that people who call themselves "The Intellectuals" understand theories, but they do not understand things. I have long been convinced that, if these men could have gone into the South and taken up and become interested in some practical work which would have brought them in touch with people and things, the whole world would have looked very different to them. Bad as conditions might have seemed at first, when they saw that actual progress was being made, they would have taken a more hopeful view of the situation."
 
-- taken from "My Larger Education, Being Chapters from My Experience", by Booker T. Washington (1856-1915). An American educator, author, political leader, and scholar, and chancellor of Tuskeegee Institute, Washington was born into slavery and lived through the Civil War. Rising to adulthood during the Reconstruction and emergence of Jim Crow laws, he was a proponent of African-American business and was a co-founder of the National Negro Business League. 


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