Civil rights advocate Dr. Alveda King, a niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., referred to statements President Donald Trump in the wake of the August 12 violence in Charlottesville VA which pitted white supremacist protesters against counter-protesters, the latter of which included members of the leftist Antifa movement. King said “Racism will never be acceptable on the planet, not just in America. We are one blood. President Donald Trump said whatever our skin color is, our blood runs red. That’s out of Acts 17:26: Of one blood, God made all people.” Quoting her famous uncle on the News Max television program recently, King said that one her favorite MLK quotes is: “‘I have decided to stick with love because hate it too a great a burden to bear.’” 

In the interview, she recommended that non-violent conflict resolution principles be used to allay hatred and violence. These include: “Gather your facts”, “Inform and educate the public”, “Examine your own heart and mind as to where you are”, “Negotiate peacefully and nonviolently”, then “Demonstrate non-violently”. She said that the result should be a “win-win situation.”

King praised Trump for his press conference at Trump Tower last week, which she said showed that he let “the American people know that he is interested, engaged, and he cares” about the situation that unfolded in Virginia. She said that Trump had “repudiated the Ku Klux Klan,” while praising him for saying that there was violence on “every side” at to the rally that led to the death of a 32-year-old counter-protester. “You’ve got an alt-right and an alt-left,” said King. “Black Lives Matter belongs to the alt-left,” she said, and engaged with the “alt-right” to “disturb people and get them so upset that they cannot think.”

After Trump said that he saw violence committed by different sides at the Charlottesville rally, and that he wanted to gather facts, former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney defiantly tweeted, "No, not the same. One side is racist, bigoted, Nazi. The other opposes racism and bigotry. Morally different universes." When asked for her reaction to the tweet, King said about the resulting “firestorm” of comment by Democrats and establishment media about Trump:  “I believe that the reason for the firestorm is so that people’s emotions are so embroiled that they can’t hear.” She recalled that in her experience as Democrat in her state legislature, she could reach out to Republicans on issues that had no partisan content.

Going on to another controversy, when King was asked about recent calls to pull down reminders of the Confederacy and slavery, she said “Leave the statues up. Let me tell you why. People will forget their history if they don’t see it...But put another statue next to them and name it ‘Liberty’ or “Everybody’s Equal’, or ‘We love Everybody’. Whatever you want to name the other statue. And to embrace the unity and commonality of the nation.”
 



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Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat and the editor of Spero News.

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