Muslim marauders hack Kenyans to death

At least ten people were killed in a raid in Witu, a small village in Kenya, just 30 miles from the site of a similar Islamist attack last week in Mpeketoni. In the earlier attack, 60 persons died at the hands of Somali jihadists who killed anyone who professed Christian faith or who did not speak the Somali language.
 
Local officiials in Kenya confirmed that the attack occured overnight on June 24. Local chieftain Kaviha Charo Karisa said the “attackers used machetes and other crude weapons... the victims have cuts and injuries.” The Star, a Kenyan daily, reported that Lamu County Commissioner Stephen Ikua confirmed that there had been a new and “unfortunate attack” overnight.
 
The June 15 attacks in Mpeketoni started while local residents had gathered in their homes to watch televised World Cup soccer matches. The Somali gunmen went on the commit further murders and arson in nearby villages on June 16.
 
The Kenyan government is now advising residents to avoid gathering in public places and to instead watch World Cup matches at home.
 
While no group has come forward to take responsibility for the attack at Witu, the Al-Shabab jihadi organization had reportedly said the previous raids were in response to the presence of Kenyan troops in Somalia. Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta however has blamed the Mpeketoni attacks on local politics.


Spero News editor Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat, who also worked as a democracy advocate and election observer in Latin America. He is also a freelance translator.

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