According to a new FBI on hate crimes, hate crimes committed against white Americans constitute the fastest growing category of hate crimes in the United States. In the 2016 Hate Crime Statistics report, the FBI indicated that in 2016, there were 876 reported anti-white hate crime offenses in the United States. In 2015, this number was 734. This indicated a 19.34 percent increase.

Additionally, there were more racial hate crime offenses altogether in 2016 compared to 2015. 
According to the report, there were 4,029 single-bias incidents that targeted “Race/Ethnicity/Ancestry” in 2015, compared to 4,229 in 2016.

Hate crimes directed at Latinos also increased in 2016. In 2015, the number of offenses directed at Latinos was 379. In 2016, that increased to 449: an increase of 18.46 percent. Hate crimes targeting black American actually declined by three offenses.

There were increases in hate crimes committed on the basis of religion, according to the report. Hate crimes directed at Jews increased by 20 percent, while hate crimes committed against Muslims increased by 26.57 percent. Anti-Catholic hate crimes also slightly increased.

While many establishment media outlets have focused on hate crimes supposedly inspired by Donald Trump’s electoral victory and inauguration, many of them have turned out to be false reports. For example, racist graffiti found on the campuse of Eastern Michigan University and anti-Muslim emails at Indiana State University this year were both found to be fraudulent. 

In October, NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health released a poll showing that a majority of white Americans believe that they are subjected to racial discrimination. More than half of whites — 55 percent — in the poll said that, in general, they believe there is discrimination against whites in America. However, a much smaller percentage believe that they have actually been subjected to racial discrimination. Of white Americans polled, 84 percent believe that discrimination against racial and ethnic minorities in America does exist today.

Note: this article corrects an earlier version.



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Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat and the editor of Spero News.

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