Rep. Steve King (R-IA) tweeted on Sunday and stirred controversy by posting: ‘We can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies.” The Iowa congressman retweeted a political cartoon that depicted the Dutch politician, Geert Wilders, who has denounced Islamism and uncontrolled immigration to the Netherlands and the rest of Europe. The cartoon features Wilders plugging a hole in a dike that protects “Western Civilization” as a flood of water bearing the star-and-crescent symbol of Islam crashes over the top. “Wilders understands that culture and demographics are our destiny,” King tweeted. “We can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies.”
 
Wilders, who has been banned from entry to Great Britain because of his controversial statements about Islam and jihad, has repeatedly urged fellow Europeans to halt Islamization of the Continent. “We must indeed stop the Islamization of our societies!” he recently tweeted.
 
On Monday, King was asked by Chris Cuomo on CNN’s “New Day” if he could clarify his tweet. King replied that he "meant exactly what I said."
 
 
"You cannot rebuild your civilization with somebody else's babies,” King told Cuomo. “You've got to keep your birth rate up, and that you need to teach your children your values." King was paraphrasing speeches he has given in Europe. "In doing so, you can grow your population, you can strengthen your culture, and you can strengthen your way of life."
 
 
Nonetheless, King wants to see less emphasis on race. "If you go down the road a few generations, or maybe centuries, with the inter-marriage, I'd like to see an America that is just so homogenous that we look a lot the same," he said.
 
King said he wants immigrants to assimilate into American culture. When Cuomo asked whether all Americans are equal, King said that culture matters. "I'm a champion for Western civilization," King said. As to immigrants, he said, "They contribute differently to our culture and civilization."
 
King said "It's the culture, not the blood. If you could go anywhere in the world and adopt these little babies and put them into households that were already assimilated into America, those babies will grow up as American as any other baby."
 
Liberals lashed out. Among them was Rep. Ted Lieu (D-CA), an  Asian-American, who tweeted a photo of his two children. He wrote: "Dear Representative Steve King: These are my two babies. --Representative Ted Lieu."  Jeb Bush, the former governor of Florida who is married to a former Mexican national, tweeted, "America is a nation of immigrants. The sentiment expressed by Steve King doesn't reflect our shared history or values." 
 
King has stirred controversy himself over the years. In advance of the 2008 presidential election, King predicted that if Barack Hussein Obama was elected to the presidency, Muslims would be dancing in the streets. “His middle name does matter. It matters because they read a meaning into that.”
 
Liberal media took him to task in 2016 during the Republican National Convention when he expressed frustration over racialist rhetoric. “This ‘old white people’ business does get a little tired,” King told MSNBC. “I’d ask you to go back through history and figure out, where are these contributions that have been made by these other categories of people … where did any other subgroup of people contribute more to civilization?”
 
Also, following President Trump’s allegation that Barack Obama had conducted electronic surveillance of Trump Tower in advance of the election, King told the New York Times that the “deep state” is seeking Trump’s ouster. “We are talking about the emergence of a deep state led by Barack Obama, and that is something that we should prevent,” King said, “The person who understands this best is Steve Bannon.” Seeking to give advice to the president, King said that Trump “needs to purge the leftists within the administration that are holdovers from the Obama administration, because it appears that they are undermining his administration and his chances of success.”
 
Iowa GOP chairman criticized King for his Twitter comments. Jeff Kaufmann said in a statement, "First of all, I do not agree with Congressman King's statement. We are a nation of immigrants, and diversity is the strength of any nation and any community."


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Spero News editor Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat, who also worked as a democracy advocate and election observer in Latin America. His first novel 'Shaken Earth', is available at Amazon.

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