Microsoft founder Bill Gates said that European countries such as Germany will not be able to absorb the “huge” influx of migrants seeking admission from Africa. Instead of Europe’s generous social welfare net for migrants, Gates suggested that Europe spend more money on foreign aid to allay the root causes of migration, but interdicting migrants at the same time.
 
In an interview with Germany’s Welt am Sonntag newspaper, he said “On the one hand you want to demonstrate generosity and take in refugees. But the more generous you are, the more word gets around about this — which in turn motivates more people to leave Africa. Germany cannot possibly take in the huge number of people who are wanting to make their way to Europe.”
 
Gates applauded German Chancellor Angela Merkel's commitment to spend 0.7 per cent of the country’s GDP on foreign aid as “phenomenal.” On Sunday, he called on other leaders to do the same. Meanwhile, Austria’s defense ministry announced that it will step up border controls long the country’s border with Italy, deploying armored vehicles.
 
Gates cautioned: “Europe must make it more difficult for Africans to reach the continent via the current transit routes.”
 
Recently, Italy’s interior minister Marco Minniti held talks with his French and German colleagues to discuss the ongoing influx of mostly African, largely Muslim, migrants. Italy has vowed to close Italy’s ports to privately-funded migrant rescue vessels operating in the Mediterranean. Other nations must take on some of the responsibility, he said, or Italy will cut funding to those refusing to help. So far this year, Italy has received over 82,000 migrants: a 19 per cent over last year. Untold numbers of migrants have been lost at sea in fragile craft seeking to cross the Mediterranean from the African shore, seeking to land on European islands such as Italy’s Lampedusa and Spain’s Canaries.
 

 



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Spero News editor Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat, who also worked as a democracy advocate and election observer in Latin America. His first novel 'Shaken Earth', is available at Amazon.

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