Despairing Christians of Iraq leave their homeland

Prayer, say Iraq's Christians, is the only solution left to them as they contend with targetted murder, forced marriage, and painful exodus.

Iraq is a country with ancient roots, and with a long history of turmoil and conflict. Presently it is trying to close the chapter of the 2003 US-led invasion, and in search of an identity that will allow it to once again stand as a nation. The gradual transfer of power back into Iraqi hands and subsequent multi-party elections, have achieved some stability. The situation, however, remains highly volatile.
 
Iraq is predominantly a Muslim country, with Islam practiced by 97% of the population. Two rival sects, Shi'ites and Sunnis, are involved in a constant and often violent power struggle. Christians have been present in Iraq for almost 2,000 years. In 2003 they numbered approximately 800,000 and although suffering discrimination, the community enjoyed relative freedom and security under the Ba'ath Party rule.
 
Today their numbers have dwindled to a mere 200,000. The rest have fled their homeland, as they stand unprotected before the threats, kidnappings, forced marriages, and killings by terrorists, religious extremists and organized crime. Clergy have been murdered and churches bombed. It is the largest Christian exodus in recent history. However, even in these times of acute crisis, priests, sisters and lay people have responded to the call of the Gospel with heroic acts of faith and love.
 
Iraq is a country with ancient roots, and with a long history of turmoil and conflict. Presently it is trying to close the chapter of the 2003 US-led invasion, and in search of an identity that will allow it to once again stand as a nation. The gradual transfer of power back into Iraqi hands and subsequent multi-party elections, have achieved some stability. The situation, however, remains highly volatile.
 
Iraq is predominantly a Muslim country, with Islam practiced by 97% of the population. Two rival sects, Shi'ites and Sunnis, are involved in a constant and often violent power struggle. Christians have been present in Iraq for almost 2,000 years. In 2003 they numbered approximately 800,000 and although suffering discrimination, the community enjoyed relative freedom and security under the Ba'ath Party rule.
 
Today their numbers have dwindled to a mere 200,000. The rest have fled their homeland, as they stand unprotected before the threats, kidnappings, forced marriages, and killings by terrorists, religious extremists and organized crime. Clergy have been murdered and churches bombed. It is the largest Christian exodus in recent history. However, even in these times of acute crisis, priests, sisters and lay people have responded to the call of the Gospel with heroic acts of faith and love.

Source: ACN
 

Comments

Jim Foley: another beheading by the 'religion of peace'

President Obama offers but a tepid response to the vicious beheading of an American. WARNING: Graphic video of the murder of journalist James Foley.

Catholic bishop denounces Mexico's treatment of migrants

Bishop Raul Vera Lopez denounced the sexual trafficking of minors in Mexico. U.S. Border patrol caught two illegal immigrants from Central America who have a history of sex crimes.

Jim Foley: another beheading by the 'religion of peace'

President Obama offers but a tepid response to the vicious beheading of an American. WARNING: Graphic video of the murder of journalist James Foley.

Global warming alarmists switch to rainfall woes

Detroit had the second highest daily rainfall since the government began keeping records in 1918. The highes daily rainfall record was set in 1925 for the Motor City.

This page took 0.1420seconds to load