In its first official statement since the deadly mass shooting in Las Vegas, the National Rifle Association (NRA) is calling for additional regulations on so-called “bump stocks.” Shooter Stephen Paddock used such a device to allow his semi-automatic rifle to fire more rapidly. While the influential lobby stopped short of recommending legislation on bump stocks, the NRA urged Congress to pass "National Right-to-Carry reciprocity."

The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act would allow gun owners to travel state-to-state with concealed weapons even in states with laws restricting concealed weapons. Noting that the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives approved the sale of bump stocks during the Obama administration, the NRA stated, “Despite the fact that the Obama administration approved the sale of bump fire stocks on at least two occasions, the National Rifle Association is calling on the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (BATFE) to immediately review whether these devices comply with federal law.”

The statement was made jointly by NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre and NRA Institute for Legislative Action Executive Director Chris Cox.

The statement went on to say, “The NRA believes that devices designed to allow semi-automatic rifles to function like fully-automatic rifles should be subject to additional regulations. In an increasingly dangerous world, the NRA remains focused on our mission: strengthening Americans' Second Amendment freedom to defend themselves, their families and their communities.”

Here is the full NRA statement:

"In the aftermath of the evil and senseless attack in Las Vegas, the American people are looking for answers as to how future tragedies can be prevented.

"Unfortunately, the first response from some politicians has been to call for more gun control. Banning guns from law-abiding Americans based on the criminal act of a madman will do nothing to prevent future attacks. This is a fact that has been proven time and again in countries across the world.

"In Las Vegas, reports indicate that certain devices were used to modify the firearms involved. Despite the fact that the Obama administration approved the sale of bump fire stocks on at least two occasions, the National Rifle Association is calling on the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (BATFE) to immediately review whether these devices comply with federal law.

"The NRA believes that devices designed to allow semi-automatic rifles to function like fully-automatic rifles should be subject to additional regulations.

"In an increasingly dangerous world, the NRA remains focused on our mission: strengthening Americans' Second Amendment freedom to defend themselves, their families and their communities.

"To that end, on behalf of our five million members across the country, we urge Congress to pass National Right-to-Carry reciprocity, which will allow law-abiding Americans to defend themselves and their families from acts of violence."

During a press conference on Thursday, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the Trump administration is “open to” reviewing policy on bump stocks. “We’re certainly open to that moving forward,” she said. “We want to be part of that conversation as it takes place in the coming days and weeks.” Police found a number of weapons in the 32nd floor room at the Mandalay Bay resort complex in Las Vegas, from which shooter Paddock fired at the 22,000 concert-goers below him.

Paddock used a bump stock to rain fire down on the ground, firing between 400 to 600 rounds per minute. He killed 58 people and wounded almost 500. Republicans on the Hill have signaled an openness to considering legislation to curb use of bump stocks. Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) said lawmakers should look at the matter, and Senate Whip John Cornyn (R-Texas) said he also wanted to examine the issue. So far, the bill has only Democrat co-sponsors.



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Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat and the editor of Spero News.

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