Linda Sarsour is a Muslim woman, born in the United States and leader of the Arab American Association of New York, who was a co-organizer of the Women’s March on Washington. She has been outspoken for years on what she terms Islamophobia as well as women’s issues. In the aftermath of the March, which was a coordinated effort that saw similar marches in all 50 state capitals of the United States, as well as several foreign countries, in repudiation of President Trump, Sarsour was interviewed by PRI radio. 
 
Organizers and the media contend that more than one million people came out worldwide on January 21 in solidarity with the March on Washington. A number of celebrities and politicians were present or spoke to rallies that day. Among them were Sen. Bernie Sanders, filmmaker Michael Moore, actress Ashley Judd, and singer Madonna Ciccone.
 
Sarsour told the interviewer that there were things already happening in the movement that inspired the March on Washington. For example, the March featured an event entitled “Ready to Run” to train women as political candidates. The March brought together a number of feminist, ethnic, leftist, and environmentalist movements, which contributed to the training. Among them were the Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute, Higher Heights for America, EMILY’s List, Latino Victory Fund, New American Leaders Project, Emerge America, and the Asian American Action Fund.
 
Sarsour said of the teach-ins in Washington DC, "It matters to me more what happens after the marches." She said, "What we hope happens is that people are so inspired and so moved that they go back to their local communities and find causes to be a part of. We have no choice. We can no longer be complacent in this country. We can't be apathetic. We cannot stay unengaged."
 
Sarsour believes the United States is witnessing the rise of a fascist regime in the form of the Trump administration. "The whole world is watching us. We hope that we make our own citizenry proud, we hope that we make our whole country proud. I hope we make our children proud. We will not allow our country to fall to fascism. It's really a time for urgency. The time is now."
 
The website of the March on Washington featured a plan of action to keep the momentum going. With its “10 actions/100 Days” program, the organizers of the March urge that this is “not the time to hang up our marching shoes.” Instead, reads the website, "It’s time to get our friends, family, and community together and make history."
 
The organizers of the Women's March will thus share an action with followers every ten days for followers to take over the next 100 days. The first action it recommends is to write a postcard to members of the Senate to tell them what actions marchers are going to take.
 
Sarsour said that were workshops on “climate justice” and “racial justice” and issues relating to the Washington DC area. Besides her proclaimed feminism, Sarsour has long been an advocate of Muslim religious law -- shariah. She has relatives who have been involved in activities of the Hamas terror organization, while a brother-in-law is currently in an Israeli prison for terrorism. 
 
In a speech during the March, Sarsour boasted of her tolerance when she said she supported Bernie Sanders' presidential bid. She figured prominently in the get-out-the-vote effort in 2008 when she coordinated these efforts in the Muslim community of Brooklyn NY. She is also a board member of the New York Immigration Coalition, a coalition of over 250 nonprofit agencies serving immigrant communities of New York State. She is regularly featured by television networks as a commentator on issues ranging from U.S. diplomatic relations with Muslim countries, Islam, domestic policy, and feminism. On Twitter, she has proclaimed the supposed advantages of shariah.
 


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Spero News editor Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat, who also worked as a democracy advocate and election observer in Latin America. His first novel 'Shaken Earth', is available at Amazon.

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