Excitement grows in search for infamous King Richard III

 

The search for the mortal remains of King Richard III is getting warmer as a team from the University of Leicester in the UK will announce dramatic new developments.
 
The search, which has entered a third week, has uncovered evidence of human remains – the first time in the search that this is disclosed.
 
The University of Leicester is leading the archaeological search for the burial place of King Richard III with Leicester City Council, in association with the Richard III Society. Over the past two weeks, the team has made major discoveries about the heritage of Leicester by uncovering the site of the medieval Franciscan friary known as Grey Friars and the eastern cloister walk and chapter house. It is believed that Richard III is buried in the chapel. The friary was demolished in the 1700s, and archeologists have found traces of it under a parking lot. Excavations have also uncovered the lost garden of former Mayor of Leicester, Alderman Robert Herrick, which have revealed medieval finds that include inlaid floor tiles from the cloister walk of the friary, paving stones from the Herrick garden, window tracery, elements of the stained glass windows of the church and artefacts including, amongst others, a medieval silver penny and a stone frieze believed to be from the choir stalls.
 
Richard Taylor, Director of Corporate Affairs at the University of Leicester and one of the prime movers behind the project, said: "What we have uncovered is truly remarkable and today (Wednesday September 12) we will be announcing to the world that the search for King Richard III has taken a dramatic new turn."
 
Leicester's City Mayor Peter Soulsby said of the dig, "This discovery adds a whole new dimension to a search which has already far exceeded our expectations. This is exciting news and I know that people across the world will be waiting to hear more about the University's find." A video documentary of the excavation is to be aired this year on Channel 4 in Britain.


Spero News editor Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat, who also worked as a democracy advocate and election observer in Latin America. He is also a freelance translator.

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