Egypt's high court decision divides the nation into two camps

On June 14, the Egyptian Constitutional Court invalidated the parliamentary elections held in Egypt in a series of election rounds held between November 28, 2011 and January 11, 2012. The judges on the court were appointed by ousted dictator Hosni Mubarak. The Vice President of the Court, Maher Sami, clarified that the verdict dissolves the assembly even if the laws so far approved will remain in force.

"The Egyptian society seems to be divided into two camps: the liberals support the decision of the Constitutional Court to dissolve Parliament, since it is dominated by the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafis. The Islamists are contrary and, especially the Salafis, that have stated they are ready to occupy Tahrir Square if the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCARF) organizes fraud in the second round of the presidential elections " said Fr. Rafic Greiche, a Greek-Catholic priest and director of communications for the Catholic Bishops of Egypt.

Quoted by the Fides news service, "I think that among the common people there is a sense of relief because somehow there is a need to correct the mistakes made in the past year and a half after Mubarak's fall" continues Fr. Greiche. "This is because right from the beginning the military relied on the Muslim Brotherhood to discover that their interests diverged. Now this covenant is broken and has created animosity between the two parties."

The 2001 that ousted Mubarak had intended to put an end to the regime in which the military was its backbone. Regarding the position of liberals and revolutionaries in this clash between military forces and Islamists, Fr. Greiche said "A lot of liberals now support the military as anti Brotherhood. The revolutionaries of Tahrir Square are themselves divided, because each has its own political vision: there are those close to the Islamists, others have more liberal views and others above all desire to get rid of the military rule in Egyptian society ".



Spero News editor Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat, who also worked as a democracy advocate and election observer in Latin America. He is also a freelance translator.

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