Pakistan court sends home 3 women forcibly converted to Islam

In Pakistan, there are 1,000 cases of forced conversions of Christian and Hindu girls and women to Islam each year.

Forced conversions to Islam is a matter of such seriousness that it "requires immediate action on behalf of the Supreme Court of Pakistan and a firm stance in defense of justice, human rights, religious freedom": is what the Commission "Justice and Peace" of the Episcopal Conference of Pakistan says, urging the Supreme Court - highest judicial organ of Pakistan - to review the case of three Hindu girls (Rinkal Kumari, Asha Haleema and Lata) forced to convert to Islam and marry Muslim men. After a judicial appeal, the Supreme Court itself, with a controversial verdict, ordered them to return to their Muslim husbands.

Referring to the case, a note of the Commission signed by the President, Fr. Emmanuel Yousaf Mani, and by the Executive Director, Peter Jacob, said: "Legal proceedings cannot become an instrument of injustice, when the principle of free consent is applied improperly or in a selective way, and in disdain towards social realities." "For example - the note explains - in one of the above cases, but in many other cases of conversions, the courts neglected to verify the age of the person converted."

"The application of the principle of free consent, without considering evidence that confirms it and without looking at the social context in which religious freedom and gender equality are still a dream, can cause a miscarriage of justice" emphasizes the note. The ruling of the Court on 18 April on the sensitive issue of conversions, "worries religious minorities, who face an existential threat already demographically, but also because of growing religious intolerance in society." The Commission asks the Court to "further consider the matter and to take a principled stand, which has a significant impact" on society. In all three cases, the Court should have applied "the legal principle of protection of vulnerable people" suggests the Commission.

"The Supreme Court or the government can control the damage to religious pluralism through the definition of forced conversions according to international standards of religious freedom which, among other things, include the right to re-convert" the note concludes, by inviting the Court to "a thorough understanding of the issue of forced conversions and the crimes that are hidden under the pretext of conversion."

Regarding forced conversions to Islam, the Federal Minister of State for Religious Harmony, Akram Gill, convened a special meeting of the National Commission for Minorities, presided by him, which brings together representatives of all religious communities. Cases of forced conversions of Hindu and Christian girls to Islam are about 1,000 every year.

Comments

Islamic State beheads Christians for supposed 'apostasy'

A Syriac Orthodox bishop of Mount Lebanon and Tripoli has been quoted as saying that Muslims are 'enemies of Jesus', in light of both ancient and modern persecution of Christians. Graphic photos.

Islamic Caliphate displays severed heads of its victims in Syria

The heads of as many as 50 prisoners of war, decapitated by Sunni adherents of the Caliphate, were displayed on sticks at Raqqa.

Islamic State beheads Christians for supposed 'apostasy'

A Syriac Orthodox bishop of Mount Lebanon and Tripoli has been quoted as saying that Muslims are 'enemies of Jesus', in light of both ancient and modern persecution of Christians. Graphic photos.

Chagas and chikungunya diseases spread in Texas

Chikungunya and Chagas disease are prevalent in Latin America. Visitors to those areas may be bringing it to the U.S. Dogs are a prime factor in spreading fatal Chagas infections.

After Israel, the next stop for Hamas is the Vatican

The Hamas terrorists have had no qualms about launching missiles at the holy city, Jerusalem, and the sites allegedly holy to Islam. So too they will have no qualms about attacking Rome.

Michigan subsidizes deer for wealthy landowners

Most deer reside on private land, according to Michigan's Department of Natural Resources, and thus need public money.

This page took 0.1367seconds to load