Minorities surpass whites in making babies

The largest and fastest-growing 'minority' group in the U.S. remains the Hispanic community. It registered an increase of 3.1 percent since 2010.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, new estimates how that  50.4 percent of the American population younger than age 1 were designated as ”minorities” as of July 1, 2011. This represents an increase from 49.5 percent that was registered in the Census taken in April 1, 2010. According to the U.S. Census, “A minority is anyone who is not single-race white and not Hispanic.” Also, according to the census bureau, the population younger than age 5 was 49.7 percent minority in 2011, up from 49.0 percent in 2010. “A population greater than 50 percent minority is considered ‘majority-minority,’” it declared.

 These are the first set of population estimates by race, Hispanic origin, age and sex since the 2010 Census, examining population change for these groups nationally, as well as within all states and counties, between Census Day (April 1, 2010) and July 1, 2011. Also released were population estimates for Puerto Rico and its municipios (local jurisdictions) by age and sex. The bureau declared that there were 114 million minorities in 2011, or 36.6 percent of the U.S. population. In 2010, it stood at 36.1 percent.

There were five majority-minority states or equivalents in 2011: Hawaii (77.1 percent minority), the District of Columbia (64.7 percent), California (60.3 percent), New Mexico (59.8 percent) and Texas (55.2 percent). No other state had a minority population greater than 46.4 percent of the total.  More than 11 percent (348) of the nation’s 3,143 counties were majority-minority as of July 1, 2011, with nine of these counties achieving this status since April 1, 2010.

True to its name, Maverick, Texas, had the largest share (96.8 percent) of its population in minority groups, followed by Webb, Texas (96.4 percent) and Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska (96.2 percent).

The new statistics also point towards the senescence of the United States. Indicating a slowly aging population, the bureau showed that there was a small uptick in the nation’s median age, from 37.2 years in 2010 to 37.3 in 2011. “The 65-and-older population increased from 40.3 million to 41.4 million over the period and included 5.7 million people 85 and older. Likewise, working-age adults (age 18 to 64) saw their numbers rise by about 2 million to 196.3 million in 2011. In contrast, the number of children under 18, 74.0 million in 2011, declined by about 200,000 over the period, largely because of the decline in high school-age children 14 to 17,” declared a statement from the bureau.

Of the states in the American union,  Maine had a higher median age than any other state (43.2), with Utah having the lowest median age (29.5). Florida had the highest percentage of its population 65 and older (17.6 percent), followed by Maine (16.3 percent). Utah had the highest percentage of its total population younger than 5 (9.3 percent). Florida, of course, has long been known for its white-haired snowbirds who flock to the Sunshine State for retirement and the resorts. According to the bureau, among counties, Sumter, Florida, was the nation’s “oldest,” with 45.5 percent of its population 65 and older, and Geary, Kan., was the nation’s “youngest” (11.4 percent younger than 5).

Here are some highlights:

Hispanics

    Nationally, the most populous minority group remains Hispanics, who numbered 52 million in 2011; they also were the fastest growing, with their population increasing by 3.1 percent since 2010. This boosted the Hispanic share of the nation’s total population to 16.7 percent in 2011, up from 16.3 percent in 2010.

    California had the largest Hispanic population of any state on July 1, 2011 (14.4 million), as well as the largest numeric increase within the Hispanic population since April 1, 2010 (346,000). New Mexico had the highest percentage of Hispanics at 46.7 percent.

    Los Angeles had the largest Hispanic population of any county (4.8 million) in 2011 and the largest numeric increase since 2010 (73,000). Starr County ─ on the Mexican border in Texas ─ had the highest share of Hispanics (95.6 percent).

 Blacks

    African-Americans were the second largest minority group in the United States, at 43.9 million in 2011 (up 1.6 percent from 2010).
    New York had the largest black or African-American population of any state or state equivalent as of July 1, 2011 (3.7 million); Texas had the largest numeric increase since 2010 (84,000). The District of Columbia had the highest percentage of blacks (52.2 percent), followed by Mississippi (38.0 percent).
    Cook, Ill. (Chicago) had the largest black or African-American population of any county in 2011 (1.3 million), and Fulton, Ga. (Atlanta) had the largest numeric increase since 2010 (13,000). Holmes, Miss., was the county with the highest percentage of blacks or African-Americans in the nation (82.9 percent).

Asians

   Asians, who numbered 18.2 million nationally in 2011, were the second fastest-growing minority group, growing by 3.0 percent since 2010.

    California had both the largest Asian population of any state (5.8 million) in July 2011 and the largest numeric increase of Asians since April 1, 2010 (131,000). Hawaii is our nation’s only majority-Asian state, with people of this group comprising 57.1 percent of the total population.

    Los Angeles had the largest Asian population of any county (1.6 million) in 2011, and also the largest numeric increase (16,000) since 2010. At 61.2 percent, Honolulu had the highest percentage of Asians in the nation.

American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN)

    The nation’s American Indian and Alaska Native population was an estimated 6.3 million in 2011, up 2.1 percent from 2010.

    California had the largest American Indian and Alaska Native population of any state in 2011 (1,050,000), and also the largest numeric increase since 2010 (23,000). Alaska had the highest percentage of AIAN (19.6 percent).


   Los Angeles had the largest AIAN population of any county in 2011 (231,000), and also the largest numeric increase (9,000) since 2010. Shannon County, S.D. ─ on the Nebraska border and located entirely within the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation ─ had the highest percentage of AIAN (93.6 percent).


Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (NHPI)

    The nation’s Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population was 1.4 million in 2011 and grew by 2.9 percent since 2010.

    Hawaii had the largest population of Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders of any state (359,000) in 2011. California had the largest numeric increase since 2010 (9,000). Hawaii had the highest percentage of NHPI (26.1 percent).


   Honolulu had the largest population of NHPI of any county (235,000) in 2011. Los Angeles County had the largest numeric increase since 2010 (2,700). Hawaii County had the highest percentage of NHPI (34.0 percent).

Non-Hispanic White Alone

    California had the largest population of single-race, non-Hispanic whites of any state in 2011 (15.0 million). Texas had the largest numeric increase in this population group since 2010 (80,000). Maine had the highest percentage of the non-Hispanic white alone population (94.3 percent).

    Los Angeles had the largest non-Hispanic white alone population of any county (2.7 million) in 2011. Miami-Dade County, Fla., had the largest numeric increase in this population since 2010 (22,000). Lincoln, W.Va, and Leslie, Ky., were the counties where the non-Hispanic white alone group comprised the highest percentage of the total population (98.5 percent each).
 



Spero News editor Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat, who also worked as a democracy advocate and election observer in Latin America. He is also a freelance translator.

Filed under science, us, demography, hispanic, latino, race, census, culture, society, North America

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