Last week, Denmark’s Supreme Court of Denmark allowed a Turkish Muslim man to appeal his deportation and life-long banishment despite having shot two women almost two years ago. The 29-year-old Burhan Kibar was found guilty of attempted murder in October 2016 and was sentenced to eight years in prison. Once the judges of Denmark’s Western High Court found that he is a “serious threat to society’s fundamental interests,” they decided to send him back to Turkey upon his eventual release.
 
During his trial, it was found that Kibar fired six shots at the front door of his ex-girlfriend’s house in 2015 in the town of Løsning. Two women behind the door -- sisters of the Turk’s ex-girlfriend -- were wounded. One of them suffered a gun shot in the abdomen, while the other suffered wounds in her right arm. In 2016, Kibar was found guilty of aggravated assault and sentenced him to four years in prison. The prosecutor, however, immediately appealed for a harsher sentence.
 
During his first trial, Kibar testified that he had visited his former girlfriend’s home in order to “talk” to her. He testified that when he realized that the woman’s father might be armed, he then “panicked” and fired his pistol. In court, he testified: 
 
“It was the father’s opinion that I had tarnished his reputation by being in a relationship with his daughter before we were married, or so I learned, and I knew what he’d do to me if he got a hold of me. Therefore, I lost my nerve and fired two warning shots into the door in order to flee. When I tried to move away from the house, I fell and fired four more shots.”
 
Kibar’s former gal pal had a different story. She accused him of being an “aggressive drug-abuser,” and claimed that when she discovered he had a wife and children back in Turkey, she tried to break up the relationship. But Kibar would not leave her alone.
 
Karoline Døssing Normann, Kibar’s attorney, greeted the Supreme Court’s decision to look into her client’s case, claiming that he was born and raised in Denmark.
 
“Is he a danger to Denmark? It is a unique situation that can hardly ever occur again. Some will probably say: ‘is it punishment for him to be banished to the country where his children live?’ But my client doesn’t feel like living in Turkey. He prefers seeing his kids in his own society, which is Denmark.”
 
She said, “He did not shoot to hit anyone fatally. It makes a difference when assessing how dangerous he is.”
 
The Supreme Court will only assess the deportation, not Kibar’s prison sentence.


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Spero News editor Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat, who also worked as a democracy advocate and election observer in Latin America. His first novel 'Shaken Earth', is available at Amazon.

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