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Stigmata & Other Manifestations

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Posted on 07/04/2003 at 15:11:25  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
I had come across this article a while back, and wanted to post it so everyone could read it.

Mystical Stigmata

quote:

Mystical Stigmata

To decide merely the facts without deciding whether or not they may be explained by supernatural causes, history tells us that many ecstatics bear on hands, feet, side, or brow the marks of the Passion of Christ with corresponding and intense sufferings. These are called visible stigmata. Others only have the sufferings, without any outward marks, and these phenomena are called invisible stigmata.

Facts

St. Catherine of Siena at first had visible stigmata but through humility she asked that they might be made invisible, and her prayer was heard. This was also the case with St. Catherine de' Ricci, a Florentine Dominican of the sixteenth century, and with several other stigmatics. The sufferings may be considered the essential part of visible stigmata; the substance of this grace consists of pity for Christ, participation in His sufferings, sorrows, and for the same end--the expiation of the sins unceasingly committed in the world. If the sufferings were absent, the wounds would be but an empty symbol, theatrical representation, conducing to pride. If the stigmata really come from God, it would be unworthy of His wisdom to participate in such futility, and to do so by a miracle.

With many stigmatics these apparitions were periodical, e.g., St. Catherine de' Ricci, whose ecstasies of the Passion began when she was twenty (1542), and the Bull of her canonization states that for twelve years they recurred with minute regularity. The ecstasy lasted exactly twenty-eight hours, from Thursday noon till Friday afternoon at four o'clock, the only interruption being for the saint to receive Holy Communion. Catherine conversed aloud, as if enacting a drama. This drama was divided into about seventeen scenes. On coming out of the ecstasy the saint's limbs were covered with wounds produced by whips, cords etc.

1. None are known prior to the thirteenth century. The first mentioned is St. Francis of Assisi, in whom the stigmata were of a character never seen subsequently; in the wounds of feet and hands were excrescences of flesh representing nails, those on one side having round back heads, those on the other having rather long points, which bent back and grasped the skin. The saint's humility could not prevent a great many of his brethren beholding with their own eyes the existence of these wonderful wounds during his lifetime as well as after his death. The fact is attested by a number of contemporary historians, and the feast of the Stigmata of St. Francis is kept on 17 September.

2. There are 62 saints or blessed of both sexes of whom the best known were:

St. Francis of Assisi (1186-1226)
St. Lutgarde (1182-1246)
St. Margaret of Cortona (1247-97)
St. Gertrude (1256-1302)
St. Clare of Montefalco (1268-1308)
Bl. Angela of Foligno (d. 1309)
St. Catherine of Siena (1347-80)
St. Lidwine (1380-1433)
St. Frances of Rome (1384-1440)
St. Colette (1380-1447)
St. Rita of Cassia (1386-1456)
Bl. Osanna of Mantua (1499-1505)
St. Catherine of Genoa (1447-1510)
Bl. Baptista Varani (1458-1524)
Bl. Lucy of Narni (1476-1547)
Bl. Catherine of Racconigi (1486-1547)
St. John of God (1495-1550)
St. Catherine de' Ricci (1522-89)
St. Mary Magdalene de' Pazzi (1566-1607)
Bl. Marie de l'Incarnation (1566-1618)
Bl. Mary Anne of Jesus (1557-1620)
Bl. Carlo of Sezze (d. 1670)
Blessed Margaret Mary Alacoque (1647-90)
St. Veronica Giuliani (1600-1727)
St. Mary Frances of the Five Wounds (1715-91)
St. Pio of Pietrelcina (Padre Pio) (1887-1968)

3. There were 20 stigmatics in the nineteenth century. The most famous were:

Catherine Emmerich (1774-1824)
Elizabeth Canori Mora (1774-1825)
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Posted on 07/04/2003 at 15:23:07  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
I was just wondering if there have ever been any Evangelical, Fundamentalist, Born-again, Bible-believing Christians who have bore the mark of the "stigmata" in history?
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Posted on 07/04/2003 at 21:25:01  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
quote:
Originally posted by AbidingNHim

I was just wondering if there have ever been any Evangelical, Fundamentalist, Born-again, Bible-believing Christians who have bore the mark of the "stigmata" in history?


Many of those who would describe themselves as the above would most likely be Calvinist Cessationists and pretty much believe that all charismatics, Catholics, and Pentecostals were going to hell or satanically deceived. So, we can safely rule out them.

But, Pentecostals are fundamentalists as well - but still, I don't think so. Even non-denom charismatics who are somewhat more open to Catholicism - I can't see it happening. I would suspect if those type of things ocurred, they would quickly become Catholic. I also believe it has to do with a unique relationship with The Blessed Mother and Saints - and it would seem very remote that a Protestant would be open to those types of graces.

Scalia touched on this with the thread on Redemptive Suffering - there really isn't a context for 'filling up what is lacking in Christ's suffering' or spiritual suffering on behalf of others, or bearing the stigmata - outside of Catholicism, and I think one must ask for, or otherwise give permission to be used in such a way.

I have been wathching for things like this for a long time, but it is possible I may have missed something.


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Posted on 09/23/2003 at 09:43:19  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
Today's Saint

Title: St. Pio of Pietrelcina ("Padre Pio")
Author: Luisa Wheeler
Date: Tuesday, September 23, 2003



For Catholics and non-Catholics alike, the spiritual and physical phenomenon which surrounds the life of Padre Pio draws interest of great proportion. But for many others and certainly for the Church Herself, it is the heroic virtue of this humble man that captivates and inspires. His life is one lived in full obedience to the virtues of prudence, temperance, fortitude and justice.

Born to a simple family in Pietrelcina, Italy in 1887, Francesco Forgione was put under the protection of his namesake, St. Francis of Assisi, at his baptism. He joined Francis' order at the age of 15 and was ordained a priest in 1910. Shortly after his ordination, Padre Pio began to experience the invisible stigmata, which was soon followed by other unique gifts that amazed even the most skeptical of believers. Many lives were converted by the grace of these extraordinary charisms — bilocation, prophetic visions, healing, reading of consciences and the stigmata —which he bore with a calm manner, yet endured with great interior and mystical suffering.

Three years to the day from receiving the invisible wounds of Christ, the deep, bloody and painful marks of the stigmata became visible on his body and stayed with him until his death. Doctors estimated that he may have lost a cup of blood every day during the 50 years he bore the wounds. Millions of people came to see Padre Pio because of these visible manifestations of holiness on his hands, feet and side. But his real virtue resounded in his heart listening to millions of confessions over his lifetime. From all over the world and from all walks of life, people sought him for direction. The poor, in particular, held a special place in his soul. His spiritual insight and his merciful guidance converted even the hardest of sinners.

His example of long hours in prayer and meditation, vigilant fasting, and a life of interior and exterior suffering reminds us of the Passion of Our Lord and the Glory of the Cross. In Pope John Paul II's homily at Padre Pio's canonization, he said, "...Our time needs to rediscover the value of the Cross in order to open the heart to hope. Throughout his [Padre Pio] life, he always sought greater conformity with the Crucified, since he was very conscious of having been called to collaborate in a special way in the work of redemption. His holiness cannot be understood without this constant reference to the Cross."

Wanting to be remembered as nothing more than a "poor friar who prayed", Padre Pio died on September 23, 1968. Following his death, the tortuous wounds that were a part of his life for over half a century, vanished from his flesh without even a scar. He was beatified on May 2, 1999 and canonized June 16, 2002. After Fatima and Lourdes, San Giovanni Rotondo, the location of the isolated monastery where St. Pio lived most of his life and where his tomb remains, is the most visited site for those in search of healing, hope and renewal.
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Posted on 04/22/2004 at 01:02:43  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
Actually, in one of his epistles, St Paul mentions having the marks of Christ on his body. I often wonder if this means the Stigmata or something else?
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Posted on 04/22/2004 at 01:38:19  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
St. Paul told the Galatians that he bore in his body the “brand marks” (stigmata) of Jesus. (6:17). I'm pretty certain that is stigmata.
"Look on the bright side, if this is the best they've got around here, in six months we'll be running this planet." (Planet of the Apes)
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Posted on 04/22/2004 at 01:56:14  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
quote:
Originally posted by Admin

St. Paul told the Galatians that he bore in his body the “brand marks” (stigmata) of Jesus. (6:17). I'm pretty certain that is stigmata.



Thats the one I was thinking of, yep! I haven't seen this discussed very much but it certainly sounds like the Stigmata. I wonder how the fundies would react upon learning that their main man had a "Catholic" stigmata!?
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Posted on 04/22/2004 at 02:11:58  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
You're right - this is not discussed much. I forgot.
"Look on the bright side, if this is the best they've got around here, in six months we'll be running this planet." (Planet of the Apes)
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Posted on 04/22/2004 at 11:36:04  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
Unfortunately, that is just too vague a reference to be useful for a proof. It could be referring to his lashes and beatings he took from the Jews.

Are there any Early Fathers who viewed it to be stigmata? I'm thinking without that, it can only be a theory - but I don't rule it out.

Another interesting verse is:

Col 1:24 Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I complete what is lacking in Christ’s afflictions for the sake of his body, that is, the church,

How can the sufferings of Christ be lacking???

It is only after being enlightened, and then going back and examining these texts that one sees these things.
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Posted on 04/22/2004 at 12:26:44  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
Allen,

I just made a response about 1 Corinthians in the "Paul, wild style" thread.
"Look on the bright side, if this is the best they've got around here, in six months we'll be running this planet." (Planet of the Apes)
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Posted on 04/22/2004 at 14:02:57  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
Good stuff! Those are valuable pieces to the puzzle.
In true dialogue, both sides are willing to change. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh
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Posted on 12/05/2005 at 20:31:06  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
I'm doing a project for school on stigmata and other religious manifestations, i was wondering if anyone had sources of where they got their information. If you dont get the chance to reply, ill research the names elsewhere, really interesting read, anxious to do my essay now, thanks.
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Posted on 12/05/2005 at 22:15:22  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
Try Wikipedia and Google. Any sources that are aligned with the Catholic Church would be beneficial. But, whether they recognize the Pope or not can also indicate their credibility.
"Look on the bright side, if this is the best they've got around here, in six months we'll be running this planet." (Planet of the Apes)
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Posted on 12/06/2005 at 06:16:49  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
www.newadvent.org may have some good information as well.
"You have made us for Yourself, and our hearts are restless until they rest in You." St. Augustine of Hippo
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Posted on 12/09/2006 at 18:29:47  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
I would not base anything from Wikipedia. The owners are aetheists. I wouldn't get my info from there..
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Posted on 12/09/2006 at 18:49:09  |  Reply  |  Report Abuse |  0
Actually, I've found some good stuff on wikipedia and no doubt posted by good orthodox Catholics - it's a mixed bag, of course.
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