According to the latest poll released by New York Times Upshot/Siena College Research, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump are facing a close fight in Florida, which is a key to winning enough Electoral College votes to win the November presidential election. While Clinton is favored by 41 percent of likely voters, Trump has the support of 40 percent. 
 
Libertarian Gary Johnson has 9 percent support, and the Green Party's Jill Stein is backed by 2 percent of likely voters. Independents are divided over the nominees of the two major parties: 34 percent are behind Trump, while 32 percent support Clinton.
 
According to the poll, Trump is leading among white voters: 51 percent to 30 percent. Clinton, however, leads among African-American voters: 82 percent to 4 percent, and Latino voters: 61 percent to 21 percent. However, neither candidate ranks high in favorability in Florida.
 
Clinton has a 40 percent favorability rating among likely voters and has 53 percent unfavorability rating. Trump is viewed favorably by 39 percent of those surveyed, but unfavorably by 55 percent.
 
Conducted from Sept. 10 to 14 among 867 likely voters, the survey has a margin of error is 3.3 percentage points. According to the RealClearPolitics average of Florida polls, Trump has a 1-point lead over Clinton, 46.2 percent to 45.2 percent.

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Spero News writer Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat, who also worked as a democracy advocate and election observer in Latin America. His first novel 'Shaken Earth', is available at Amazon.

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