Rumors flew on Monday and continued to fly on Tuesday concerning whether or not Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will resign or be fired. Before his appearance at the United Nations on Tuesday, President Trump said he expects to meet Rosenstein at the White House on Thursday. “I'm meeting with Rod Rosenstein on Thursday when I get back from all of these meetings," Trump said. "And we'll be meeting at the White House, and we'll be determining what's going on. We want to have transparency, we want to have openness and I look forward to meeting with Rod at that time."

Harvard University professor emeritus Alan Dershowitz, however, is convinced that Rosenstein will soon depart. Appearing on Fox & Friends on Tuesday, Rosenstein said that Rosenstein’s tenure at the Department of Justice will soon be at an end. “He is not going to be the deputy attorney general after the election,” Dershowitz said. “The question is only now timing. Whether or not the president wants to fire him, whether he would prefer to have him resign, whether he wants him to become an election issue, what happens in terms of succession, who replaces him, what impact it has on [Special Counsel Robert] Mueller. But if you ask me who is the deputy attorney general of the United States starting in January of next year, it will not be Rod Rosenstein.”

In the interview, Dershowitz criticized Rosenstein for reportedly giving consideration to invoking the 25th Amendment that would remove Trump from the presidency. “The 25th Amendment was intended for president who was shot, a president who had a stroke, a president who is incapacitated,” Dershowitz said. “Not a president you disagree with, or you think is creating havoc in the White House. That, you have an election for.”

Dershowitz went on to say, “But you don’t use the 25th Amendment promiscuously. And even mentioning the 25th Amendment — The New York Times stand by its story that it was not a joke. It was a serious discussion. That is disqualifying.”

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders spoke with show host George Stephanopoulos on "Good Morning America" Tuesday and would not give any assurances about Rosenstein’s position. When Stephanopoulos asked whether the president has confidence in Rosenstein, Sanders replied: “The president has confidence in the system.”

“That’s not what I asked,” Stephanopoulos said. Sanders replied: “I’m not going to get ahead of the conversation that’s going to take place, certainly he wants things to take place,” Sanders said of Trump's upcoming meeting with Rosenstein. “There have been a number of incidents that have caused a great deal of concern, not just to the president but to Americans all over the country.”

Sanders said that she wishes to see special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation brought quickly to an end because, she said, he has found no “collusion” on the part of the Trump campaign with Russia."I'm not going to get ahead of where the president is but he has been very clear he wants this to come to a conclusion,“ Sanders said. “We expect that it should and, again, they've spent a year and a half and found nothing that has anything to do with this president because there was nothing.”

It was Rosenstein who appointed Mueller, a former director of the FBI, to lead the investigation which has so far netted two convictions: of Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and volunteer George Papadopoulos. 
 

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Spero News writer Martin Barillas is a former US diplomat, who also worked as a democracy advocate and election observer in Latin America. His first novel 'Shaken Earth', is available at Amazon.

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